Archive for Hot Off The Press

Here’s this week’s Art Inspiration Hit List–a few links to wonderful artwork from around the interweb to get you thinking, dreaming, and creating.

This week’s theme is Typography. I love type and words and use language frequently in my own artwork.

Each of these artists is making very different work, but all use type or letters as their focus or starting point–sometimes just graphically as symbols or shapes, sometimes to evoke the past or assert the human hand–other times, to use it as a jumping off point to explore visual expression digitally.

I hope they inspire you to carry your own ideas forward into your own unique new territory.

Are you drawn to using language or type in your own work? Which of these artists speak to you?

Take a look and let me know what you think in the comments!


Carved from Crayons by Diem Chau

Artist Diem Chau carved these fun letters and animals out of crayons–sweet, intimate, graphic.

Letters of the alphabet and accompanying images carved from Crayons by Diem Chau


“Evolution of Type: Fossilized Typography” by Andreas Scheiger

Austrian designer Andreas Scheiger creates fossilized tpyography in his project, Evolution of Type

Evolution of Type: Fossilized Typography by Andreas Scheiger


Typography Created with String and Nails by Corn Studio

Corn Studio was commissioned by Petrol to create a sign for their shop. They used hundreds of pins and untold yards of thread to create this elegant and graphic piece.

Petrol: Handmade Accessories (Pin Typography)


Lumen Type: Experimental Typography by Ruslan Khasanov

Viewing this artist and designer’s work is like seeing him mid-conversation with the world through typography and design–sometimes by pushing the boundaries of the new as well lovingly embracing its history. Very interesting.

Lumen Type: Experimental Typography by Ruslan Khasanov

 

Here’s this week’s Art Inspiration Hit List–a few links to wonderful artwork from around the interweb to get you thinking, dreaming, and creating.

This week’s theme is Paper Sculpture!

These artist’s are making precise, interesting, wacky, thought-provoking, exciting work.

I hope they inspire you to carry your own ideas forward into your own unique new territory.

Have you ever considered working three-dimensionally with paper? Take a look and let me know what you think in the comments!


Li Hong Bo’s Flexible Paper Sculptures Are Mind Bending

Watch this short wacky video. Then you MUST MUST MUST click on the link to see the rest of his work. It’s funny, smart, weird and wonderful. I love it.

XMqeWam


Jen Stark‘s Totemic Cut Paper

One of the things I love about Jen Stark’s art is that it’s  both simple and complicated at the same time. Playful and provocative, each individual piece feels almost totemic and is completely interesting by itself and as part of the whole series.  Please click through her list of images–great, great stuff.

jen stark burst


 Peter Gentenaar’s Ethereal, Organic, Fluid, Sculptural Paper…Beings 

Gentenaar seems to make living breathing paper organisms. Graceful and organic, they seem to both float and have serious substance. Truly lovely. When you visit his site, it might be unclear how to see more work. Click on the image on the right and it will open a slideshow.

petergentenaar2

 

Here’s this week’s Art Inspiration Hit List–a few links to wonderful artwork from around the interweb to get you thinking, dreaming, and creating.

This week’s list is called Sucess After Seventy!

Because our ambitious, career oriented culture can easily make you feel woefully “behind” or like it’s “too late” for you and your art dreams, I thought I’d highlight 3 women artists who created wonderful work and achieved recognition for it well after 70. (Thank you Blouin Art Info for this inspiration!)

I hope these artists inspire you to carry your own ideas forward into your own unique new territory.

Take a look and let me know what you think in the comments!


Abstract Painter Carmen Herrera Sold Her First Painting at 89

 Love this work. Bold, fresh and powerful, the Museum of Modern Art scooped up several pieces and at age 94, her goal is to make “larger works.” That’s what I’m talking about!

Carmen Herrera


Early Collage Artist Mary Delany

Working in the late 1700′s, Mary Delany created nearly 1,700 intricate, botanically accurate depictions of plants and flowers with hundreds of pieces of cutout paper. Her work was so wonderful that the King started sending her specimens from the royal gardens as subjects for her collages.  Read more here and see more images here and here.

Mary Delaney


 Iranian Artist Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian Creates Gorgeous Mirrored Mosaics

 Farmanfarmaian was born in 1924 and steadily created art her entire adult life, but as Blouin Art Info explains, “she’s only become more prolific and adventurous with age.” Her work is now collected the the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Click on the header or the image below to see more work!

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Here’s this week’s Art Inspiration Hit List–a few links to wonderful artwork from around the interweb to get you thinking, dreaming, and creating.

This week’s theme is LARGE beaded artwork. I like the way these artists think so big with a medium developed for creating  jewelry.

All four of these links are great, but I’m especially crazy about the musical instruments of hanging buttons by Augusto Esquival and the Star Trek installation by Devorah Sperber which is not only clever but is also a super successful example of a perfect marriage between technique and concept.

I hope these artists inspire you to carry your own ideas forward into your own unique new territory: Take a look and let me know what you think in the comments!


Monumental Pieces Created with Thousands of Buttons, Pins, and Beads by Ran Hwang

This photo does her work no justice, so you must click on it to see it up close. This is a quote from the artist:
“I create large icons such as a Buddha or a traditional vase, using materials from the fashion industry. The process of building large installations are time consuming and repetitive and it requires manual effort which provides a form of self-meditation. I hammer thousands of pins into a wall like a monk who, facing the wall, practices Zen.”
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ran-1

 


Beaded Miss Havisham Sculpture from a Second Hand Furniture Shop – photo by Gareth Williams

Gareth Williams took this photo of an intricately beaded sculpture reminiscent of Miss Havisham from Charles Dickens’ classic novel, “Great Expectations.” I don’t know who made this, but I really like how the beaded over-the-topness of their technique really expresses Miss Havisham’s…..mmmm….psychological situation. Even without putting her in a flowing dress.

El AnatsuiSecond Hand Furniture Shop in Rye - Jan 2009 - Miss Havisham by Gareth Williams

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Augusto Esquivel Uses Strings of Buttons to Create Pieces that Resemble Life-Sized Instruments

We found this artist on Visual News, and the best description in the blurb called this work “three dimensional pointillism.” Click on the link to see all the musical instruments he’s created–somehow the ethereal quality of these carefully hung buttons creates a visual expression of music–the most abstract art of all.

Strings of Buttons Become Life-Sized Musical Instruments by Augusto Esquivel


Mirror Universe by Sculptor Devorah Sperber

Even if you’re not a Star Trek fan, the marriage between technique and concept in this piece (owned by Microsoft, btw) is completely successful. It’s about a particular popular episode from the 1967 Star Trek, but what’s so perfect about it is that the beads create the “beaming up” feeling of the transporter–the half here, half not here thing perfectly–Sperber managed to create a physical expression of a sci-fi fantasy that we’ve seen over and over but only as expressed through special effects or CGI.  I think that’s very cool. Click on the link to see close ups and read more about it on the Amusing Planet website.

star-trek (2)[2]

 

Here’s this week’s Art Inspiration Hit List–a few links to wonderful artwork from around the interweb to get you thinking, dreaming, and creating.

This week’s theme is TINY ART!  Small, intimate work you can hold in your hand.  If you ever feel like you have no room to create–here’s some inspiration for how to make work in the teeniest of spaces.

All four of these links are great, but I’m especially crazy about Cathy Cullis’s lovely drawings in general and her tiny book below and I love the silvery carved pencil tips by Dalton Getti–crazy small!

I hope these artists inspire you to carry your own ideas forward into your own unique new territory: Take a look and let me know in the comments–does working small like appeal to you?|

Cathy Cullis – Tiny Books of Black and Gold

Great drawings on her site in general–and I love the gold crown here and this little book format. Perfect.

Cathy Cullis

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Willard Wigan – “Micro Sculptor”

Willard Wigan, “Micro Sculptor”, creates sculptures that fit in the eye of a needle! Click on the link to view more of the little narratives he manages to create in that teensy-teensy space!

El Anatsui

Willard Wigan - Micro Sculptor

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Miniature Art on Toilet Paper Rolls by Anastasia Elias

Anastasia Elias creates multiple layers of art within the rolls, so you can view each scene from both perspectives. She explains her process on her site, so make sure to click and see how it all works!

Miniature Art of Toilet Paper Rolls by Anastasia Elias

 


Dalton Ghetti – Pencil Tip Sculptures

Brazillian artist Dalton Ghetti carves tiny sculptures out of the tips of pencils.

Dalton Ghetti - Pencil Tip Sculptures

Here’s this week’s Art Inspiration Hit List–a few links to wonderful artwork from around the interweb to get you thinking, dreaming, and creating.

I’m not sure this week has a theme, except it’s all women artists and I love all of it. What do you think, is there a theme? Monumentality maybe?

I hope these artists inspire you to carry your own ideas forward into your own unique new territory: Take a look and let me know in thecomments–do any of these artists resonate with you?

Toshiko Takaezu – The Earth In Bloom

OMG, I love this woman’s monumental ceramic pots–I’m working on my own (hopefully monumental) felt pots, so I’ve been obsessed with vessels of all kinds lately–by contemporary artists like Toshiko or 10,000 year old pots from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Whatever you do, click on the link to view more–huge, silent, eternal, totemic. Everything you want in a giant ceramic pot.

pots by window


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Deborah Zlotsky – The Beauty of Mistakes

I’m crazy about these paintings by Deborah Zlotsky and I love the way they talk about them on this site–The Flood.
Here’s a quote from the artist: “As I adjust one relationship, another slips out of balance. Overlaying, abrading, reconfiguring, and repeatedly repainting and revarnishing create slippage between the past, present and future, as accidents and change remain visible in each work.” Definitely click on the image below to view more!

Debora ZlotskyEl Anatsui

 


Mixed Media Art by Jill Ricci

Jill Ricci also doesn’t plan her work, but builds up layers and layers to evoke a sort of history of place somehow–kind of the way layers of torn wallpaper in an old house evoke stories in your mind of multiple lives and memories–scraps of evidence that create a beautiful new composition and story. Love these paintings!

Jill Ricci - "Proud" mixed media art

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Wood Block Art by Betty Parsons

Even though these pieces aren’t big, they have a monumental feeling to me. And Betty Parsons was a monumental personality herself–a strong, independent, free thinking woman in the early 20th century–a successful artist, curator, and gallery owner who was an early supporter of Abstract Expression.

Betty Parsons Wood Block Art

Here’s this week’s Art Inspiration Hit List–a few links to wonderful artwork from around the interweb to get you thinking, dreaming, and creating.

This week is about unexpected surfaces–work that transforms a surface and/or creates a new surface. Surprise can be a great aesthetic pleasure and these artists run the gamut from finding fabulously creative ways to cover giant objects like abandoned airplanes to tiny, intimate surfaces like a leaf.

I hope these artists inspire you to carry your own ideas forward into your own unique new territory:

Click on each link or image to view more of their work–Enjoy!

10 Artists Transform Abandoned Planes

Two art curators got 10 different artists to transform a field of abandoned airplanes–click on the image below to see how the different artists solved this design problem–so fabulous!

The Boneyard Project: Nose Job

 

“Decorating Nature: An Alternate, Painterly World” by Norm Magnusson

Much environmental art functions on a grand scale–but I’m intrigued by these tiny paintings on leaves and pine needles and decomposing logs. Click on the image below to see his tiny personal mark-making in the woods.

fig.-44-some-leaves-zig-where-others-zag

El Anatsui

El Anatsui

Firewall: An Interactive Fabric Surface by Aaron Sherwood

Who knew light and spandex could create such a cool, tactile, interactive aesthetic experience!
I love this.

Aaron Sherwood's "Firewall" Interactive Art

A Rainbow of Origami Street Art by Mademoiselle Maurice

Large, colorful geometric shapes and patterns created by lots of tiny origami pieces create interesting surprises in unexpected places on the street.  I love the movement she creates and that push-pull between large and small. Click on the image below to see close-ups and more.

Origami Street Art by Mademoiselle Maurice